^ Picot J, Jones J, Colquitt JL, Gospodarevskaya E, Loveman E, Baxter L, Clegg AJ (September 2009). "The clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bariatric (weight loss) surgery for obesity: a systematic review and economic evaluation". Health Technology Assessment. 13 (41): 1–190, 215–357, iii–iv. doi:10.3310/hta13410. hdl:10536/DRO/DU:30064294. PMID 19726018.
Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is a syndrome in which a person's blood sugar is dangerously low. People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are at risk for this condition. There are other diseases that can cause a person's blood sugar levels to go too low, for example, pancreatitis, Cushing's syndrome, and pancreatic cancer. Symptoms and signs that your blood sugar levels are too low include: 

Early, intensive, multifactorial (blood pressure, cholesterol) management in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus was associated with a small, nonsignificant reduction in the incidence of cardiovascular disease events and death in a multinational European study. [73] The 3057 patients in this study had diabetes detected by screening and were randomized to receive either standard diabetes care or intensive management of hyperglycemia (target HbA1c < 7.0%), blood pressure, and cholesterol levels.
^ Jump up to: a b c Simpson TC, Weldon JC, Worthington HV, Needleman I, Wild SH, Moles DR, Stevenson B, Furness S, Iheozor-Ejiofor Z (November 2015). "Treatment of periodontal disease for glycaemic control in people with diabetes mellitus". The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (11): CD004714. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD004714.pub3. PMC 6486035. PMID 26545069. 

^ Palmer SC, Mavridis D, Nicolucci A, Johnson DW, Tonelli M, Craig JC, Maggo J, Gray V, De Berardis G, Ruospo M, Natale P, Saglimbene V, Badve SV, Cho Y, Nadeau-Fredette AC, Burke M, Faruque L, Lloyd A, Ahmad N, Liu Y, Tiv S, Wiebe N, Strippoli GF (July 2016). "Comparison of Clinical Outcomes and Adverse Events Associated With Glucose-Lowering Drugs in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Meta-analysis". JAMA. 316 (3): 313–24. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.9400. PMID 27434443.
Hearing that your child or loved one has diabetes can be a shock. But after that shock wears off, know that there are plenty of things you can do to help manage this illness. With planning and preparation, you can get back to normal life and resume your daily activities. You can make physical activity part of every day. You can create a balanced diet for your child—one that everyone can live with and thrive on. Throughout it all, know that diabetes can’t keep your child from doing whatever they want and achieve their highest goals. There are Olympic athletes with diabetes, as well as professional football players, politicians, actors, rock stars, and CEOs. So, take a deep breath. You can do so much to make sure the people you love are thriving as they manage their diabetes.

Don’t worry. The first thing you should do if you have these symptoms is to make an appointment to see your doctor. He or she may suggest that you get a screening test done. This is a simple blood test (fasting blood glucose, or HbA1c) that can tell you if you’re likely to have diabetes. Your doctor will also do a thorough check to look for other causes of your symptoms, and refer you to a urologist for further evaluation if needed.


^ Jump up to: a b c Simpson TC, Weldon JC, Worthington HV, Needleman I, Wild SH, Moles DR, Stevenson B, Furness S, Iheozor-Ejiofor Z (November 2015). "Treatment of periodontal disease for glycaemic control in people with diabetes mellitus". The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (11): CD004714. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD004714.pub3. PMC 6486035. PMID 26545069.

This happens because constantly high levels of sugar in the blood stream can damage the blood vessels of the penis, or the blood vessels supplying the nerves to the penis. When the blood vessels and nerves are damaged, the blood flow to the penis is significantly reduced, resulting in erectile dysfunction. Other causes of erectile dysfunction include smoking, heart disease, high blood pressure and high cholesterol levels.
[Guideline] USPSTF. Public comment on draft recommendation statement and draft evidence review: screening for abnormal glucose and type 2 diabetes mellitus. US Preventive Services Task Force. Available at http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Announcements/News/Item/public-comment-on-draft-recommendation-statement-and-draft-evidence-review-screening-for-abnormal-glucose-and-type-2-diabetes-mellitus. Accessed: Oct 14 2014.
Our Safe at School Campaign® ensures that the diabetes management needs of students are met so your children are healthy and safe when they are at school. By working as a team, families, healthcare providers, and school staff work to monitor blood sugar and administer insulin. In addition to that, we can help sure that all students have trained staff on hand who can recognize and treat high and low blood sugar and administer emergency glucagon.

A 2010 Consensus Report from a panel of experts chosen jointly by the American Diabetes Association and the American Cancer Society suggested that people with type 2 diabetes are at an increased risk for many types of cancer. [89] Patients with diabetes have a higher risk for bladder cancer, particularly those patients who use pioglitazone. [90, 91] Age, male gender, neuropathy, and urinary tract infections were associated with this risk.
^ Hilawe, Esayas Haregot; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Leo; Aoyama, Atsuko (1 September 2013). "Differences by sex in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glycaemia and impaired glucose tolerance in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis". Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 91 (9): 671–682D. doi:10.2471/BLT.12.113415. PMC 3790213. PMID 24101783.
I’ve partnered with @amdiabetesassn to show my life with t1d and break the stereotypes that are associated with t1d showing urgency & true side of the disease👊🏻 I continue to do the things I love, even though this disease prevents me from living a normal life. It is a 24/7 job.. everything I do is calculated and everything I do has to be thought out for precautions. I’m lucky to have CGMs to make constantly checking my blood sugars a little easier. But still, sitting in the middle of the ocean can bring fear of “what ifs”- what if I go low, what if i can’t get to shore in time.. but I prepare all that I can, carry glucose wherever I go and trust. The way we think is not the norm. Sometimes i often think it’s a burden that I’ll carry for the rest of my life preventing me from my adventures.. But we don’t let the negativity and those fears get in the way of doing what we love💙 This is my #EverydayReality with t1d.
Fat distribution. If you store fat mainly in the abdomen, you have a greater risk of type 2 diabetes than if you store fat elsewhere, such as in your hips and thighs. Your risk of type 2 diabetes rises if you're a man with a waist circumference above 40 inches (101.6 centimeters) or a woman with a waist that's greater than 35 inches (88.9 centimeters).
Diabetes is a disease that affects your body’s ability to produce or use insulin. Insulin is a hormone. When your body turns the food you eat into energy (also called sugar or glucose), insulin is released to help transport this energy to the cells. Insulin acts as a “key.” Its chemical message tells the cell to open and receive glucose. If you produce little or no insulin, or are insulin resistant, too much sugar remains in your blood. Blood glucose levels are higher than normal for individuals with diabetes. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2.
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